Histon & Impington Community Orchard Project

Planting map

Page last updated: 18 November 2015

Introduction

This page gives a list of the trees that have been planted in the orchard.

There is a wide variety of trees in the orchard, including apples, pears, gages, cherries, a mulberry, a quince and a medlar. In the lists below, the tree type is apple unless otherwise stated.

Please note For most of the trees listed, extra information can be found by clicking on the + symbol by the name.

Trees planted

East Anglian Medley

Planted in February 2013

1. Neild’s Drooper

  • Type: Dual Purpose Apple
  • Origin: Woburn Park, Bedfordshire, 1915
  • Pick: Oct
  • Eat: Oct-Dec
Other information

This tree has a distinctive weeping habit. The apples are rich and sweet. Medium flushed orange. Slightly acidic.

2. D’Arcy Spice

  • Type: Dessert Apple
  • Origin: Tolleshunt D’Arcy Essex, 1785
  • Pick: Oct
  • Eat: Jan-May
Other information

A slow growing tree. The apples keep for a long time and develop a complex spice-like flavour. Medium russet.Slightly acidic.

3. Sturmer Pippin

  • Type: Dessert Apple
  • Origin: Sturmer, Essex, 1800
  • Pick: Oct
  • Eat: Jan-June
Other information

The ribbed, almost oblong apples are green with brown/orange flush. They are crisp and firm when picked and become less sharp with storage. Medium green flushed brown. Slightly acidic.

4. Beth Pear

  • Type: Pear
  • Origin: East Malling, Kent, 1930
  • Pick: Aug
  • Eat: Aug
Other information

A neat, compact, upright tree. The pears are small, sweet and melt in the mouth.

5. St Edmund’s Russet

  • Type: Dessert Apple
  • Origin: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, 1845
  • Pick: Sept
  • Eat: Sept-Oct
Other information

A sweet russet apple that makes excellent juice. Medium russet. Sweet

6. Wallice’s Wonder (Plum)

  • Type: Dessert Plum
  • Origin: Bluntisham, Cambridgeshire, 1960
  • Pick: Sept
  • Eat: Sept-Oct
Other information

A cross between Severn Cross and Victoria. A medium to large sized purple skinned plum with soft, sweet flesh. Medium large yellow flushed red. Sweet

7. Five Crowned Pippin

  • Type: Culinary Apple
  • Origin: Norfolk, 1500
  • Pick: Nov
  • Eat: Nov-Feb
Other information

The name comes from five ribs at the base of the apple. Crunchy yellow flesh that holds shape when cooked. Medium green flushed red. Acidic.

8. Murfitt’s Seedling

  • Type: Culinary Apple
  • Origin: Histon area, Cambridgeshire, 1883
  • Pick: Oct
  • Eat: Oct-Jan
Other information

Once popular in the Cottenham and Histon areas. The apples hold their shape well when cooked and need almost no sugar. Large green. Slightly acidic

9. Perfection

  • Type: Dessert Apple
  • Origin: Bluntisham, Cambridgeshire, 1960
  • Pick: Oct
  • Eat: Oct-Nov
Other information

A cross of Cox’s Orange Pippin and Worcester Pearmain. A very crisp and juicy apple; excellent for juicing. Medium large flushed red. Sweet

10. Cambridge Gage

  • Type: Dessert Gage
  • Origin: Histon, Cambridgeshire, 1927
  • Pick: Aug
  • Eat: Aug
Other information

A greenish yellow skinned gage that is probably a seedling of Green Gage. A more prolific cropper than Green Gage. Sweet, soft, juicy flesh. Medium green. Sweet.

11. Willingham Gage

  • Type: Dessert Gage
  • Origin: Willingham, Cambridgeshire, 1800
  • Pick: Aug
  • Eat: Aug-Sept
Other information

Raised at Willingham as a seedling of a Green Gage. Selected by the RHS for its good cropping and excellent fruit quality. Large green. Sweet.

12. Norfolk Beefing

  • Type: Culinary Apple
  • Origin: Norfolk, 1698
  • Pick: Nov
  • Eat: Dec-Apr
Other information

Known in Norfolk for centuries but may have originated in France or Holland. Excellent for making dried apple rings, for baking and for cider making. Medium flushed red. Slightly acidic.

13. Warden Pear

  • Type: Culinary Pear
  • Origin: Old Warden, Bedfordshire, 1600
  • Pick: Oct
  • Eat: Nov-Mar
Other information

The name is derived from the Cistercian Abbey at Warden, where the fruit may have originated, possibly as early as the 1300s. The flesh is coarse and firm. Excellent for bottling and roasting. Large green flushed brown. Sweet.

14. Chivers Delight

  • Type: Dessert Apple
  • Origin: Histon, Cambridgeshire, 1920
  • Pick: Oct
  • Eat: Nov-Jan
Other information

Raised by Stephen Chivers of Histon. Sweet crisp, flavour. A good garden apple. Medium large flushed green red. Sweet.

15. Suffolk Pink

  • Type: Dessert Apple
  • Origin: Earl Stonham, Suffolk, 1990
  • Pick: Sept
  • Eat: Sept-Oct
Other information

Our youngest variety – a ‘sport’ of the New Zealand apple Gala, which was found growing in orchards at Earl Stonham. Now enjoying some commercial success locally. Medium flushed pink. Sweet.

16. Lady Hollendale

  • Type: Dessert Apple
  • Origin: Cambridgeshire, 1920
  • Pick: Aug
  • Eat: Aug
Other information

This apple was sold at the Wisbech fruit markets in the 1920s and 30s. The crisp and juicy apple doesn’t keep – eat within a week of picking! Medium flushed red. Sweet.

17. Histon Favourite

  • Type: Dessert Apple
  • Origin: Histon, Cambridgeshire, 1800
  • Pick: Sept
  • Eat: Oct-Dec
Other information

Raised by John Chivers of Histon. The apple has a sharp and crisp flavour when picked, mellowing with storage. Good for cooking too. Medium large yellow. Slightly acidic.

18. Discovery

  • Type: Dessert Apple
  • Origin: Langham, Essex, 1949
  • Pick: Aug
  • Eat: Aug-Sept
Other information

The Beaujolais Nouveau of apples – an early variety grown commercially in the UK. Lacks flavour if picked too early so leave until the apples have developed a red skin. Medium large flushed red. Sweet.

19. Lord Peckover

  • Type: Dessert Apple
  • Origin: Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, 1926
  • Pick: Aug
  • Eat: Aug
Other information

An apple from Peckover House gardens in Wisbech. The skin has a peach-like white bloom. A very early dessert variety, best eaten in August. Medium large flushed pink. Sweet.

Central Circle

Planted in February 2013

20. Wayside

  • Type: Dessert Apple
  • Origin: Cambridge, 1930
  • Pick: Sept
  • Eat: Oct-Nov
Other information

Raised by Miss Cunningham of ‘Wayside’, Huntington Road, Cambridge. The apple has distinctive fruity-tasting crisp flesh. Medium large reinette. Sweet.

21. Jolly Miller

  • Type: Culinary Apple
  • Origin: Cottenham, Cambridgeshire, 1883
  • Pick: Sept
  • Eat: Sept-Oct
Other information

Once popular in the Cottenham area, this tree is possiibly named after the village Public House where fruit was once traded. A lost apple that was rediscovered in 2005. Medium yellow flushed red. Slightly acidic.

22. Histon Favourite

  • Type: Dessert Apple
  • Origin: Histon, Cambridgeshire, 1800
  • Pick: Sept
  • Eat: Oct-Dec
Other information

Raised by John Chivers of Histon. The apple has a sharp and crisp flavour when picked, mellowing with storage. Good for cooking too. Medium large yellow. Slightly acidic.

23. Cottenham Seedling

  • Type: Culinary Apple
  • Origin: Cottenham, Cambridgeshire, 1923
  • Pick: Oct
  • Eat: Nov-Mar
Other information

Raised by Robert Norman of Cottenham. A long keeping cooking apple once popular with gardeners and commercial growers around Cambridge. Cooks to a bright lemon puree with excellent flavour. Medium yellow flushed red. Slightly acidic.

24. Murfitt’s Seedling

  • Type: Culinary Apple
  • Origin: Histon area, Cambridgeshire, 1883
  • Pick: Oct
  • Eat: Oct-Jan
Other information

Once popular in the Cottenham and Histon areas. The apples hold their shape well when cooked and need almost no sugar. Large green. Slightly acidic.

25. New Rock Pippin

  • Type: Dessert Apple
  • Origin: Cambridge, 1821
  • Pick: Oct
  • Eat: Jan-May
Other information

Raised by William Pleasance in the Barnwell area of Cambridge. A spice-like flavour coupled with excellent keeping qualities. Medium reinette. Sweet.

26. Chivers Delight

  • Type: Dessert Apple
  • Origin: Histon, Cambridgeshire, 1920
  • Pick: Oct
  • Eat: Nov-Jan
Other information

Raised by Stephen Chivers of Histon. Sweet crisp, flavour. A good garden apple. Medium large flushed green red. Sweet.

Fruit Trees in Curved Hedge

Planted in December 2013

27. Robin Pear

  • Type: Dessert Pear
  • Origin: Norfolk
  • Pick: Aug
  • Eat: Aug-Sep
Other information

Exact place of origin unknown, but has been grown in Norfolk for centuries. Once a common sight on local markets. A small red flushed sweet pear best eaten very soon after picking.

28. Hacon’s Incomparable Pear

  • Type: Culinary Pear
  • Origin: Downham Market, 1792
  • Pick: Oct
  • Eat: Oct-Nov
Other information

Raised by a Mr Hacon in the early 1800’s. Produces crops of green good looking pears which have a sweet and delicious flavour when cooked.

29. Johnny Mount Pear

  • Type: Dessert Pear
  • Origin: Colchester area, pre-1900
  • Pick: Late Oct
  • Eat: Nov-Dec
Other information

Known around Colchester but exact place of origin not known. A medium-sized, russet pear. A heavy cropper best eaten near Christmas.

30. Coe’s Golden Drop Gage

  • Type: Dessert Gage
  • Origin: Bury St Edmunds, late 1700s
  • Pick: Sept
  • Eat: Sept-Oct
Other information

Raised by nurseryman Jervaise Coe of Bury. It is a large amber coloured fruit distinctively spotted with red flecks. A heavy cropper, very sweet and juicy and considered by many as the best flavoured of all plums.

31. Swan Gage

  • Type: Culinary Gage
  • Origin: Sawbridgeworth, Hertfordshire, 1898
  • Pick: Aug
  • Eat: Aug
Other information

Medium large, round-oval fruit with dark red skin which is usually covered with a heavy purple bloom and tiny primrose dots. The sweet, juicy flesh has a pleasant flavour. It can be eaten as a dessert variety but better suited to culinary use.

32. Willingham Gage

  • Type: Dessert Gage
  • Origin: Willingham, Cambridgeshire, 1800
  • Pick: Aug
  • Eat: Aug-Sept
Other information

Raised at Willingham as a seedling of a Green Gage. Selected by the RHS for its good cropping and excellent fruit quality. Large green. Sweet.

33. Summer Sun Cherry

  • Type: Dessert Cherry
  • Origin: Norwich, 1990
  • Pick: July
  • Eat: July
Other information

Summer Sun is a modern English dark red cherry variety with firm crisp flesh and a good flavour. It is one of the best cherry varieties for the UK, being a reliable cropper with good frost tolerance. It is particularly suitable for colder more exposed locations.

34. Colney Cherry

  • Type: Dessert Cherry
  • Origin: Norwich, 1980
  • Pick: July-Aug
  • Eat: July-Aug
Other information

Colney is a new large English dark red/black dessert cherry, with a good cherry flavour. It is later ripening than other varieties.

35. Merchant Cherry

  • Type: Dessert Cherry
  • Origin: Norwich, 1976
  • Pick: June-July
  • Eat: June-July
Other information

A large black skinned variety with very dark red flesh and good flavour. It is heavy cropping and fruits early.

Orchard Parkland

Planted in March 2014

36. Isaac Newton’s Tree

  • Type: Culinary Apple
  • Origin: Woolsthorpe, Lincolnshire, 1850
  • Pick: Oct
  • Eat: Nov-Jan
Other information

Descended from a tree that was growing in the 1660s in the gardens of Woolsthorpe Manor, near Colsterworth – the home of Sir Isaac Newton. A large ribbed and irregularly shaped orange-red flushed apple, with a few broken red stripes. It cooks to a mildly acidic puree.

37. Lord Burghley

  • Type: Dessert Apple
  • Origin: Burghley, Cambridgeshire, 1834
  • Pick: Oct
  • Eat: Jan-Apr
Other information

Found growing as a seedling tree at Burghley House. Rescued by the Head Gardener and first sold by a Peterborough nurseryman. It became a popular gardeners’ choice and received an RHS award in 1865 for its long keeping qualities. Sweet tasting, it will keep until April.

38. Green Harvey – Planted in 2015

  • Type: Dual Purpose Apple
  • Origin: Cambridgeshire, 1813
  • Pick: Oct
  • Eat: Dec-Apr
Other information

A long keeping green skinned variety. Course fleshed so keeps shape quite well when cooked and needing little sugar.

39. Saint Everard

  • Type: Dessert Apple
  • Origin: Papworth Everard, Cambridgeshire, 1900
  • Pick: Sept
  • Eat: Sept-Oct
Other information

An early dessert apple bred at Papworth Everard Hall by crossing Margil and Cox’s Orange Pippin. Small to medium in size. Distinctly flushed dark red with an aromatic taste.

40. Thoday’s Quarrendon

  • Type: Dessert Apple
  • Origin: Willingham, Cambridgeshire, 1949
  • Pick: Oct
  • Eat: Nov-Feb
Other information

Discovered growing at Willingham by nurseryman Mr. Ralph Thoday. it is probably a seedling of the dessert variety Devonshire Quarrenden. Small sized with a bright red skin. It will keep until February. Came first in the ‘Orchard Tree Vote’ held at Histon and Impington Feast Market, 2013.

41. King James Mulberry

  • Type: Mulberry
Other information

A very attractive tree, slow growing but long-lived and capable of growing to quite a large size. The dark red, almost black, fruit are similar to blackberries in appearance but are very juicy with an exquisite intense sweet sharp flavour.

42. Laxton’s Fortune

  • Type: Dessert Apple
  • Origin: Bedford, 1904
  • Pick: Sept
  • Eat: Sept-Oct
Other information

Raised by Laxton Brothers, the famous Victorian plant breeders from Bedford. It is a cross between Cox’s Orange Pippin and Wealthy. The skin is pale yellow, mottled with orange and red. The flesh is sweet and firm.

43. Meeches Prolific Quince

  • Type: Culinary Quince
  • Pick: Oct
  • Eat: Oct-Nov
Other information

Meeches Prolific is one of the most popular quince varieties grown in the UK. Unlike many it gives a good crop in the British climate. It produces attractive large slightly pink blossom. The fruit is quite large and pear shaped. It ripens in October turning a golden yellow colour and developing a strong quince aroma. Excellent for making quince jelly.

44. Huntingdon Codlin – Planted in 2015

  • Type: Dual Purpose Apple
  • Origin: Huntingdon, 1883
  • Pick: Sept
  • Eat: Sept-Oct
Other information

Introduced by nurserymen Wood and Ingram of Huntingdon. The skin is pale yellow with a few red stripes. The soft and juicy cream coloured flesh is not very acidic and will cook to a frothy puree.

45. Flanders Medlar

  • Type: Medlar
  • Pick: Oct-Nov
  • Eat: Oct-Dec
Other information

This produces medlars that are about 7cm across. The fruit, which is rich in vitamin C has a delicious, acidic flavour which should be given time to ripen before eating.

46. Ingall’s Grimoldby Gage

  • Type: Dessert Gage
  • Origin: Grimoldby, Lincolnshire, 1900
  • Pick: Aug
  • Eat: Aug-Sept
Other information

A large green gage with sweet fruit. Came second in the ‘Orchard Tree Vote’ held at Histon and Impington Feast Market, 2013.

47. Yellow Apricot Bullace

  • Type: Culinary Bullace
  • Pick: Aug
  • Eat: Aug-Sept
Other information

A greenish yellow skinned gage that is probably a seedling of Green Gage. A more prolific cropper than Green Gage. Sweet, soft, juicy flesh, excellent for jam making.

48. Polstead Black Mazzard Cherry

  • Type: Dessert Cherry
  • Origin: Polstead, Suffolk, 1900
  • Pick: July
  • Eat: July
Other information

A small black skinned sweet cherry local to the village of Polstead near Hadleigh. Recorded as being sold on Sudbury market in the 1940s. Distinctively red fleshed and very juicy.

49. Archduke Cherry

  • Type: Dessert Cherry
  • Origin: Hertfordshire, 1750
  • Pick: July
  • Eat: July
  • Other information

    Came third in the ‘Orchard Tree Vote’ held at Histon and Impington Feast Market, 2013.

20th Century Orchard

Planted in February 2015

Chivers Delight – 9 trees

  • Type: Dessert Apple
  • Origin: Histon, Cambridgeshire, 1920
  • Pick: Oct
  • Eat: Nov-Jan
Other information

Raised by Stephen Chivers of Histon. Sweet crisp, flavour. A good garden apple. Medium large flushed green red. Sweet.

Newton’s Wonder – 7 trees

  • Type: Cooking / dual purpose apple
  • Origin: Melbourne, Derbyshire, 1887
  • Pick: Oct
  • Eat: Nov-Mar
Other information

Grown commercially in the Chivers orchards. Very large fruits. A good apple for baking or juicing.

Spartan – 1 tree

  • Type: Dessert apple
  • Origin: Summerland, British Columbia, Canada, 1926
  • Pick: Oct
  • Eat: Oct
Other information

Grown commercially in the Chivers orchards. A small, red, sweet apple still widely grown commercially today.

Blenheim Orange – 1 tree

  • Type: Dual purpose
  • Origin: Blenheim Park, Oxfordshire, 1740
  • Pick: Sept-Oct
  • Eat: Oct-Dec
Other information

Grown commercially in the Chivers orchards. Apples cook to a stiff puree, but also good for eating.

Tydeman’s Early Worcester – 1 tree

  • Type: Dessert apple
  • Origin: East Malling, Kent, 1928
  • Pick: August
  • Eat: September
Other information

Grown commercially in the Chivers orchards. An early apple flavoured with a hint of strawberry.

Bramley’s Seedling – 1 tree

  • Type: Cooking apple
  • Origin: Southwell, Nottinghamshire, 1809
  • Pick: early – mid Oct
  • Eat: Nov-Mar
Other information

Grown commercially in the Chivers orchards. The classic english cooking apple, also good for juicing and cider.

Worcester Pearmain – 1 tree

  • Type: Dessert apple
  • Origin: Worcester, 1874
  • Pick: September
  • Eat: Sept – Oct
Other information

Grown commercially in the Chivers orchards. A sweet apple, whose flavour develops if the fruit is left on the trees.

Howgate Wonder – 1 tree

  • Type: Cooking apple
  • Origin: Bembridge, Isle of Wight, 1915
  • Pick: Oct
  • Eat: Nov-Mar
Other information

Grown commercially in the Chivers orchards. Very large apple – good for juicing and cider.